This Is What Your Farts Reveal About Your Health

On January 24, 2016 by Physical Culturist

By: Sun Gazing

This Is What Your Farts Reveal About Your Health

There is a quick and easy way to gain insight into your overall general health. All you have to do is pay attention to your farts. It may sound strange, but your gaseous emissions can reveal a lot more than you’d ever imagine about your bodily health and wellness. Doctors and scientists have uncovered a lot of great information on what the different odors and types of toots can reveal about what’s going on inside our bodies. In particular, it can help us know whether our digestive system and gastrointestinal tract are functioning normally, or if there may be a problem.

First, it’s best to be familiar with what exactly farts are. They’re basically basically a mix of air we ingest and gases produced by bacteria in the lower intestine. When we breathe, we sometimes end up swallowing air, and certain foods and carbonated beverages are also sources of the air that winds up in our digestive systems. That air accumulates and needs to exit the body, which it does through either burps out the mouth or farts out the other end. The gasses in your intestine are created as the bacteria in them digest and break down sugars and starches. Like swallowed air, it too builds up and needs to be released. If you pass gas normally and regularly it means you’re healthy and as long as you’re comfortable when it happens, it should be fine.

By monitoring flatulence activities you can pick up on any changes or abnormal occurrences in your health. This helps you to be more aware of any potential issues going on inside you that are causing your farts to suddenly smell different. If you find that all of a sudden you’re passing really stinky gas, that’s smellier than usual, this could be a sign that there’s something off balance going on inside you. Maybe your gut bacteria is out of whack or your not eating healthy enough. If you’re experiencing a lot of frequent gas, that smells extremely foul and even you find it offensive, it could be related to a chronic problem like gastroenteritis, celiac disease, or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The word “frequent” here means more than average, which is about 20 farts a day for most people. However, what is average for one person may be alarming to another since farting is quite subjective and varies from person to person.

Beyond smells, the timing of farts also matter. People who are lactose intolerant have to pass gas right after they eat anything dairy. A majority of people are lactose intolerant to a degree, so if this happens to you and it’s accompanied by a lot of discomfort, tell your doctor and get it checked out. Frequent tooting can also be a sign of an underlying food allergy and/or wheat intolerance. Listen to your body and keep track of how certain foods make you feel right after consuming them.

Furthermore, it’s important to note that not all smelly gas is bad or a sign of ill health. It’s inevitable that some of your farts will smell nasty because about 1% of the gas generated by intestinal bacteria smells like hydrogen sulfide. Hydrogen sulfide has a distinctively acrid odor that stinks, it’s similar to that of rotten eggs, and when you release it everyone near you will notice. The source of this malodorous gas is often healthy foods, like broccoli, beans, cauliflower, dairy and red meat, so if those foods are in your diet and what you’re passing is stinky, don’t be alarmed because it’s normal.

Once you’re familiar with what’s normal it’s much easier to spot, or rather smell, any potential issues or irregularities. So do your body a favor and familiarize yourself with the smells it produces and don’t forget to pass this along to family and friends as well. The more everyone knows, the better!

source: Sun Gazing

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