The Various Squat Forms of Elite Powerlifters

On May 17, 2014 by Physical Culturist

Below are photo excerpts from Fred Hatfield’s (unfortunately out-of-print) powerlifting book, where he talks about the different squat forms of various elite powerlifters. Pretty cool!

An excerpt from Fred Hatfield’s (unfortunately out-of-print) powerlifting book, where he talks about the different squat forms of various elite powerlifters

An excerpt from Fred Hatfield’s (unfortunately out-of-print) powerlifting book, where he talks about the different squat forms of various elite powerlifters

An excerpt from Fred Hatfield’s (unfortunately out-of-print) powerlifting book, where he talks about the different squat forms of various elite powerlifters

An excerpt from Fred Hatfield’s (unfortunately out-of-print) powerlifting book, where he talks about the different squat forms of various elite powerlifters

An excerpt from Fred Hatfield’s (unfortunately out-of-print) powerlifting book, where he talks about the different squat forms of various elite powerlifters

An excerpt from Fred Hatfield’s (unfortunately out-of-print) powerlifting book, where he talks about the different squat forms of various elite powerlifters

source: tumblr

One Response to “The Various Squat Forms of Elite Powerlifters”

  • Seduciary

    220 lb Ed Coan is considered by many as the greatest powerlifter of all time, but his bench (584 lbs) isn’t quite up to par to his insane squats and deadlifts. Mike Bridges has set world records in all 3 lifts, in both the 165 and 181 lb class, with an insane 529 bench in the 181’s.

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