What Your Poop and Pee are Telling You about Your Body

On April 3, 2014 by Physical Culturist

Have you ever wondered if your poop looked “normal,” but were too embarrassed to ask anyone else what their poop looks like? Or has your pee ever smelled a bit putrid but you were too mortified to utter a word to your best friend, let alone your boy friend? Poop is an important part of health and affects your beauty, as everything in your body works as an interrelated system. Well don’t worry, because here is a guide to anything and everything you may have wondered about your pee, and yes, your poop.

What Your Poop and Pee are Telling You about Your Body

source: kimberlysnyder.net

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