Old Time Strongman Diets

On January 13, 2014 by Matthew Chan

During the early 19th century (also known as the era of Physical Culture), there existed a group of strongmen who set the standard for today’s strength athletes and all lifters in general. Interestingly, most of these men stayed relatively lean throughout the year while still increasing their strength.

Like many strongmen today, their diets varied and showed many differences when compared with each other. If you’re looking for the perfect diet to gain their legendary strength and musculature, you’re out of luck. By exploring the diets of these old timers, however, you can gain some insight on their eating habits, and perhaps incorporate them into your own diet. Everybody responds differently to different foods and plans, so it’s important that you do not blindly follow somebody else’s way, but rather, discover your own way. Find what works for you individually.

This article will explore the dietary habits of seven old time strongmen: Eugen Sandow, George Hackenschmidt, The Saxon Trio, Thomas Inch, Hermann Goenrer, Edward Aston, and Louis Cyr. Whether you’re looking to gain some muscle mass, get strong, or both, the examples below will give you some ideas on what you can implement into your own diet.

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