Physiques of 19th Century Physical Culture

On November 10, 2013 by Physical Culturist

A short while ago, we asked our facebook fans which physique (male and female) they found most appealing.

Interestingly enough, the majority of the votes went to physiques that resembled those of oldtime physical culturists of the 18th to early 19th century (votes A and B for men, B and C for ladies).

These physical culturists were not excessively muscled nor were they too skinny. Their bodies exuded health, strength and athleticism. They were not only extremely strong, but were also capable of performing acrobatic feats. They recommended people to combine strength training with some form of gymnastics and running. Doing so kept their bodies strong, robust, mobile, agile and flexible throughout their entire lives.

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